Tips for Dental Anxiety | Riverside, CA

Regular dental visits are important, but we realize that many people suffer from dental anxiety. This can be a fear of the known – perhaps there was a frightening dental visit in the past – or the unknown. This dental video uses a little bit of humor to address those fears.
We offer many items to help our patients overcome their dental anxiety. These include watching movies, dental sedation, nitrous oxide, blankets and memory foam chair pads. Make sure to ask one of our team members for any of these comfort items at your next visit.

Contact Dr. Gerald Middleton at (951) 688-3442 or visit our website today to schedule your appointment.

Dr. Gerald Middleton also proudly serves Corona, San Bernardino, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Lake Elsinore, and surrounding areas.

What Are My Dental Filling Options? | Riverside, CA

Dr. Gerald Middleton of Riverside, CA is an experienced dentist and offers plenty of options for you to choose from when it comes to dental fillings. Many patients are confused by what kinds of dental filling options are available for their procedure.

The options vary depending on the patient’s health, where and how the filling is placed, the amount of chewing pressure the tooth will have to bear, components of the filling material and the number of visits needed to prepare and accommodate the tooth. Some of the choices include amalgam, composite and ionomers.

Amalgam fillings are very durable, easy to use, and inexpensive when compared to other materials. Since amalgam fillings can sustain very heavy chewing loads, they are usually used to restore molars. Some of the disadvantages of amalgam fillings are that the silver tone is not as natural looking, possible short-term sensitivity, and more tooth structure are removed to conform the filling.

Composite fillings are made out of a mixture of glass or quartz and resin, this mix produces a tooth colored filling. Composite fillings are durable and provide good resistance against fracture in small to medium restorations where there is moderate chewing pressure. Because less tooth structure is removed when using a composite, a smaller filling can be used than one using amalgam. Some downsides of composite fillings are that they are moderately more expensive than amalgam depending on the size of the filling and technique used.

Ionomers, on the other hand, are made out of a mixture of acrylic acids and fine glass powders. Ionomers are usually utilized to fill cavities on the root surfaces of teeth or in small fillings that do not require any chewing resistance since they have low protection against fractures.

As with any procedure, Dr. Gerald Middleton suggests that you should call us today at (951) 688-3442 , visit our website to schedule an appointment or come into the office where we can fully discuss which option is better and most efficient for you.

Dr. Gerald Middleton also proudly serves Corona, San Bernardino, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Lake Elsinore, and surrounding areas.

Content Received from ADA

Oral Health and Heart Health are Closely Linked

At Dr. Middleton’s Dental Office, we are always telling our patients how important it is to keep up with your oral health, because serious heart problems can occur if you develop periodontal disease or other oral health complications. Read on for some more information on how a healthy heart starts with a healthy mouth:

THURSDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) — For adults, losing teeth is bad enough, but tooth loss is also associated with several risk factors for heart disease, a large international study suggests.

These heart disease-related risk factors include diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and smoking.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 16,000 people in 39 countries who provided information about their remaining number of teeth and the frequency of gum bleeds. About 40 percent of the participants had fewer than 15 teeth and 16 percent had no teeth, while 25 percent reported gum bleeds.

For every decrease in the number of teeth, there was an increase in the levels of a harmful enzyme that promotes inflammation and hardening of the arteries. The study authors also noted that along with fewer teeth came increases in other heart disease risk markers, including “bad” LDL cholesterol levels and higher blood sugar, blood pressure and waist size.

People with fewer teeth were also more likely to have diabetes, with the risk increasing 11 percent for every significant decrease in the number of teeth, the investigators found.

Being a current or former smoker was also linked to tooth loss, according to the study scheduled for presentation Saturday at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), in San Francisco.

Gum bleeds were associated with higher levels of bad cholesterol and blood pressure.

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The researchers added that it is still unclear what is behind the association between tooth loss, gum health and heart health.

“Whether periodontal disease actually causes coronary heart disease remains to be shown. It could be that the two conditions share common risk factors independently,” Dr. Ola Vedin, from the department of medical sciences at Uppsala University in Sweden, said in an ACC news release. “Those who believe that a causal relationship exists propose several theories, including systemic inflammation, the presence of bacteria in the blood from infected teeth and bacteria invading coronary plaques.”
WebMD News from HealthDay
By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

The full article can be found at: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20130307/tooth-loss-associated-with-higher-risk-for-heart-disease