Tag Archives: Riverside CA Dentist

Keep Your Dental Appointments with Sedation Dentistry | Riverside Dentist

dental fearDoes the thought of having your teeth worked on make you anxious or uncomfortable? Do the sight of needles and the sound of dental drills make you cringe? Are you constantly skipping out on dental appointments for fear of pain or nerves? You needn’t worry anymore. Would you believe you could have everything done while you nap comfortably and awake to not remembering anything from the procedure? By the use of oral sedation, we can do this for you. In fact, we have been helping people overcome these fears for many years. Think you may have a dental fear or phobia, but can’t be sure? Here are a few of the more common symptoms experienced by patients:

  • High dental anxiety and fear
  • A severe gag reflex
  • Difficulty getting numb
  • Extensive treatment needs
  • A desire to have dentistry done comfortably while they are fully relaxed

We understand that going to the dentist can be very difficult for some people. Dental phobia is actually a lot more common than you may think. It is estimated that about 15% of Americans avoid going to the dentist because of this reason. So, if you feel that you may have an issue that prevents you from keeping your dental appointments, talk to your dentist about these fears. There are lots of new developments in dental technology that can not only calm your nerves during a dental procedure, like local anesthesia and sedation dentistry, but also prepare you for your dental appointment with medications that will help to relax you. Your smile doesn’t need to suffer because you are scared of the dentist chair.

To set up an appointment, call Dr. Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442 or visit www.gmdental.com.

Dr. Middleton proudly accepts patients from Riverside, Corona, San Bernardino, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Lake Elsinore and all surrounding areas.

Why a Professional Cleaning Is Necessary | Riverside Dentist

If we want to keep our smile healthy and bright, keeping up with our dental hygiene is an important of our daily routine. By regularly cleaning our teeth, we prevent oral bacterial infections that lead to complications in other parts of our body, such as the brain, lungs, heart and so on.

Something else we can do to maintain our oral health all year round is to visit the dentist regularly for professional cleanings twice a year. There are two reasons why you’ll want to have your teeth cleaned at the dentist’s office – to prevent tooth loss and to prevent oral infections from infecting other parts of your body.

In a way, professional dental cleanings help level the playing field. It helps remove most of the plaque and tartar responsible for the infection, so that your body’s immune system won’t have to fight them off on its own. This then lowers your mouth’s risk for gum disease.

Before and during the procedure, the dentist will explain to you the status of your oral health, like why your teeth are sensitive or why your gums are bleeding, and what’s going to be done to help remedy your situation. In some cases, such as when you already have gum disease, your dentist may recommend deep cleaning, or scaling and root planning. This type of treatment is more thorough than a regular dental cleaning. This is type of cleaning is necessary when there are already large amounts of tartar and bacteria under your gums.

To set up an appointment, call Dr. Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442 or visit www.gmdental.com.

Dr. Middleton proudly accepts patients from Riverside, Corona, San Bernardino, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Lake Elsinore and all surrounding areas.

Myth Busters: Mouthwash Edition | Riverside Dentist

As much as we hate to admit it, some of our favorite foods leave us with some of the worst breath. We enjoy our garlic, onions and coffee, and the dragon breath that follows is completely worth it. Pop in a stick of gum and we’re good. What if I told you it’s all a myth, that mouthwash isn’t helping you out with bad breath at all? Sorry to have to break the news, but it’s true.

So, what causes bad breath? While there are a few medical conditions that can cause bad breath, poor dental hygiene is generally what causes everyday cases of it. We naturally produce saliva to help our mouth maintain a healthy pH balance and break up all the built-up bacteria, giving us bad breath.

Okay, let’s look at mouthwash. We know for a fact that mouthwash is full of alcohol, some as much as 25 percent. We also know that alcohol dehydrates us. So, by default, mouthwash is also dehydrating. Now, if mouthwash dehydrates us, we are not producing enough saliva. Not enough saliva, our pH balance is thrown off and bacteria is allowed to collect. Mouthwash is actually doing the complete opposite of what we thought!

Now, what do we do? Drink water. The more you drink, the more saliva you’re producing. Brush and floss a couple times a day, and tongue scrape at least once daily. If you are in a jam, munching on an apple or a stick of gum will do the trick.

To set up an appointment, call Dr. Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442 or visit www.gmdental.com.

Dr. Middleton proudly accepts patients from Riverside, Corona, San Bernardino, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Lake Elsinore and all surrounding areas.

Welcome Dr. Pavlisin! | Riverside Dentist

Join us in welcoming Dr. Pavlisin to our team. She has recently moved to California, and her practice philosophy aligns very well with ours. You may wonder if this means Dr. Middleton is ready to retire, but rest assured he is not going anywhere. We simply now have two highly skilled dentists to deliver the excellent dental care you expect from us.

I am fairly new to California having been raised in Illinois, attending dental school at the University of Illinois and then practicing there for 26 years. During that time, I continued to study advances in dentistry by attending The Pankey Institute and The Dawson Center as well as continuing to complete many courses to enhance my dental skills and to provide my patients with state of the art treatment techniques.

Since in California, I have been in private practice part time and am a Clinical Professor at Western University Dental School. I enjoy teaching and mentoring our new generation of dentists. I have also had the opportunity to donate dental care for a women’s shelter in Ensenada, Mexico and to the underserved at the Care Harbor events in LA.

I feel privileged to be joining Dr. Middleton’s team because of his commitment to dental excellence and his ethical practice philosophy. I admire the relationships he develops with his patients, as I value the relational aspect of dentistry as well. I also love the art of dentistry and how the beauty of a smile is supported by health and biology.

My husband and I will be celebrating 30 years of marriage this year. We have 5 children ages 27 to 19. My husband’s change of career prompted our move to California. Although it was very difficult leaving my wonderful patients and friends in Illinois, our family has been blessed in many ways here. I enjoy spending time with my family, hiking, cooking, reading, and Southern California gardening!! Maybe even some travel now that we’re empty nesters!

To set up an appointment, call Dr. Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442 or visit www.gmdental.com.

Dr. Middleton proudly accepts patients from Riverside, Corona, San Bernardino, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Lake Elsinore and all surrounding areas.

Inlays and Onlays: What’s the Difference? | Riverside Dentist

ThinkstockPhotos-512962507Inlays and onlays are the ideal dental restorations needed to repair damaged teeth, not only improving your oral hygiene, but enhancing the look of your smile.  Dental inlays and onlays are used when old fillings need to be removed or replaced. A dental inlay is similar to a filling and fits inside the cusp tips (top edges) of the tooth. A dental onlay is more extensive and extends over the cusps of the treated tooth. Both will rejuvenate your smile! Dr. Middleton can also use inlays and onlays to replace dark, old dental restorations that can look unappealing.

There are two types of inlays and onlays: direct and indirect. Direct inlays and onlays are made in the dental office. They are placed in one visit. Indirect inlays and onlays are made in a laboratory. Two visits are needed to place them. The type your dentist will use depends on how much of the tooth is left.

Direct Inlays and Onlays

Your dentist will remove the decay and shape the tooth. He or she will put a soft material called composite resin on the tooth. The composite resin is molded to fit the tooth. The inlay is removed and hardened in a special oven. Then, your dentist will cement the hardened inlay to your tooth. After the inlay is cemented, it will be polished. Your dentist may have to shape it slightly to adjust the way your teeth come together.

There is also new technology that allows the dentist to have a ceramic inlay or onlay made in the office and cemented on at the same visit.

Indirect Inlays and Onlays

Your dentist will remove the decay. He or she then will make an impression of the prepared tooth and neighboring teeth. The tooth will get a temporary filling. The impression will be sent to a laboratory, which will make the inlay or onlay.

At your second visit, your dentist will take out the temporary filling and clean and dry the tooth. He or she will then cement the inlay or onlay to the tooth. Then it will be polished. Your dentist may have to shape it slightly to adjust the way your teeth come together.

Some dentists have a machine that allows the dentist to take a picture (instead of an impression) of the prepared tooth. Then a computer guides the machine in making a ceramic inlay, onlay or crown. This process can take less than one hour. Your inlay or onlay can then be cemented into place at the same visit.

Inlays and onlays are completely natural looking dental restorations that will restore the strength and stability to your teeth. Dr. Middleton emphasizes that inlays and onlays will make your oral hygiene routines easier! In only two dental visits, your oral health will drastically improve with inlays and onlays.

A dental inlay or onlay is bigger than a filling and smaller than a crown. It is bonded or cemented into place. An inlay is actually similar to a filling, but it lies within the cusps (bumps) on the chewing surface of your tooth. An onlay is larger than an inlay. It replaces one or more decayed cusps.

Inlays or onlays can be made of gold, composite resin (plastic) or ceramics. They can last for 10 years or longer. How long they last depends on:

  • The material used
  • The teeth involved
  • The forces of chewing
  • How well you maintain them with good oral hygiene and regular visits to a dentist

Watch this informative video on Inlays and Onlays:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5Wu8_MCnJs (Source: YouTube)

Only Dr. Middleton will be able to determine whether or not inlays and onlays will be right for your situation.

For more information about bad breath prevention, call Dr. Gerald Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442. Visit our website for special offers, updates and to make an appointment, www.gmdental.com.

Accepting patients from Riverside, Norco, Ontario, Murrieta, Fontana and surrounding communities.

How Mouthwash Has Been Lying to Us | Riverside Dentist

toothbrushLet’s face it, some of our favorite foods leave us with some of the worst breath. We enjoy our garlic, onions and coffee, and the state they leave our breath is horrific but completely worth it. Just gargle a little bit of mouthwash & we’re good…right? What if I told you it’s all a myth, that mouthwash isn’t helping you out with bad breath at all? Sorry to have to break the news, but it’s true.

Before I begin, let’s take a quick look at what causes bad breath in the first place. We have bacteria in our mouths, both good and bad. While there are a few medical conditions that can cause bad breath, poor dental hygiene is generally what causes everyday cases of it. If you don’t brush and floss regularly, it is easy for plaque and harmful bacteria to collect and multiply inside of our mouths. That’s where our saliva comes in. We naturally produce saliva to help our mouth maintain a healthy pH balance. We produce saliva, then it breaks up all the built-up bacteria and prevents it from sticking around, giving us bad breath. Couple that with your daily brushing and flossing, and you have a relatively healthy mouth.

Saliva is our natural line of defense against bad breath. Now let’s look at mouthwash. We know for a fact that mouthwash is full of alcohol, some as much as 25 percent. We also know that alcohol dehydrates us. So, by default, mouthwash is also dehydrating. Now, if mouthwash dehydrates us, we are not producing enough saliva. Not enough saliva, our pH balance is thrown off and bacteria is allowed to collect. Mouthwash is actually doing the complete opposite of what we thought!

But what about the claims made by mouthwash ads to “kill bacteria and bad breath chemically”? Well, mouthwash does kill bacteria. It has to with all of that alcohol in it. The problem is, mouthwash cannot distinguish between the harmful bacteria and the bacteria it needs to leave alone because it is actually helping our mouth.

There were once claims that mouthwash could actually replace your daily dental regime. Nothing could be further from the truth. Mouthwash cannot remove plaque. Nothing liquid can remove plaque. It needs to be removed by physically removing it with a toothbrush and floss. If you aren’t doing either of those, the plaque remains on your teeth and the mouthwash cannot get to the bacteria in order to kill it.

So, what do we do when we get a case of bad breath? Forget about mouthwash and use water. Brush and floss a couple times a day, and tongue scrape at least once daily. Your tongue is full of bacteria so a good scraping is pretty necessary. If you are in a jam and don’t have a dental kit around, munching on an apple or a stick of gum will do the trick. Both will help produce saliva. And don’t forget to drink lots of water. Not only is it just good for you and keeping you hydrated, but the more you drink, the more saliva you’re producing. No more bad breath!

If you are in need of a professional cleaning, contact Dr. Gerald Middleton, DDS in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442 to schedule an appointment today! Or visit www.gmdental.com for additional information.

Dr. Gerald Middleton proudly serves Riverside, Corona, San Bernardino, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Lake Elsinore and all surrounding areas.

Riverside, CA Dentist | What to Expect From Your Dental Crown Procedure

dental crowns riverside ca

Dental crown procedures are recommend to patients mainly because of the reasons: First, is that you have a weak tooth that requires a bridge or something else to hold it together; second is if you have a tooth has already been so discolored that it can no longer be fixed through conventional means; the third is simply for cosmetic reasons.

Regardless of which of the three categories you fall into, you’ll most likely have to choose the type of crown you want placed on your teeth.

The most common choices are resin and stainless steel. Though, cosmetic crowns are often made out of porcelain or ceramic.

It’s important that you take the time to do research on the pros and cons of each type, as well as ask your dentist to make a recommendation based on what is best for your teeth’s specific situation.

The Procedure

Installing a dental crown should only take two visits – first for installation of the temporary crown and the second for the placement of the permanent one.

During the initial visit, the dentist will examine the problem tooth and make sure that it is still able to support a crown. After this, the dentist will begin filing it down in preparation of the crown. Though, in cases of severely damaged and broken teeth, the dentists may have to fill the tooth in first so that it’s large enough for the crown to fit in.

Once the dentist has finished filing or filling the tooth, the dentist will then take an impression of the tooth and its surroundings. This impression will then be sent to a dental lab where a permanent crown will be made according to its measurements.

Since the permanent crown will take some time to finish, your tooth will be fitted with a temporary crown that will help protect it and keep it in shape until the permanent crown is ready for placement.

Caring For A Temporary Crown

Because they weren’t built to last for more than a few weeks, you will have to take extra care of your temporary crown.

Dentists will usually suggest a few precautionary tips before sending you off, including:

  • Staying away from sticky, as well as chewy foods as much as possible because they can grab and pull off the crown.
  • Make a conscious effort to chew on the side of your mouth where the temporary crown was not fitted.
  • Hard food, such as bones, raw vegetables, etc.  can break the crown and should be avoided.
  • When flossing, try to do it to the side rather than lifting it out. This way, you won’t pull off the temporary crown by accident.

The Second Visit

Your dentist will notify you once the permanent crown is finished and ready. By then, you will have your second visit, where the temporary crown is removed and the dentist will then position, as well as fasten the permanent crown. To do this, dentists will use a special adhesive and take extra care to make sure that the crown is placed properly.

Once placed and everything is taken care of, the dentist will send you off along with a few necessary tips and advises.

Do remember that crowned teeth require as much care as normal teeth, so don’t forget to brush and floss regularly, rinse using an antibacterial mouthwash, and of course, visit your dentist for regular checkups and cleaning.

If you feel you could benefit from a dental crown or would like to schedule an appointment call the office of Gerald Middleton DDS at 951-688-3442. Learn more about his practice by visiting his website at www.gmdental.com.

Bad Breath Could Mean Big Problems! | Riverside, Ca Dentist

119504435Do you suspect you have bad breath? If so, it might be an indication of other problems and not just a lack of proper oral hygiene. With perpetual bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth may be a warning sign of gum (periodontal) disease. Gum disease is caused by the buildup of plaque on teeth. Bacteria cause the formation of toxins, which irritate the gums. If gum disease continues untreated, it can damage the gums and jawbone.

The medical condition dry mouth (xerostomia) also can cause bad breath. Saliva is necessary to moisten the mouth, neutralize acids produced by plaque, and wash away dead cells that accumulate on the tongue, gums, and cheeks. If not removed, these cells decompose and can cause bad breath. Dry mouth may be a side effect of various medications, salivary gland problems, or continuous breathing through the mouth.

Many other diseases and illnesses may cause bad breath. Here are some to be aware of: respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia or bronchitis, chronic sinus infections, postnasal drip, diabetes, chronic acid reflux, and liver or kidney problems.

Bad breath can be reduced or prevented if you:

  • Practice good oral hygiene. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste to remove food debris and plaque. Brush teeth after you eat (keep a toothbrush at work or school to brush after lunch). Don’t forget to brush the tongue, too. Replace your toothbrush every 2 to 3 months or after an illness. Use floss or an interdental cleaner to remove food particles and plaque between teeth once a day. Dentures should be removed at night and cleaned thoroughly before being placed in your mouth the next morning.
  • See your dentist regularly — at least twice a year. He or she will conduct an oral exam and professional teeth cleaning and will be able to detect and treat periodontal disease, dry mouth, or other problems that may be the cause of bad mouth odor.
  • Stop smoking and chewing tobacco-based products. Ask your dentist for tips on kicking the habit.
  • Drink lots of water. This will keep your mouth moist. Chewing gum (preferably sugarless) or sucking on candy (preferably sugarless) also stimulates the production of saliva, which helps wash away food particles and bacteria. Gums and mints containing xylitol are best.
  • Keep a log of the foods you eat. If you think they may be causing bad breath, bring the log to your dentist to review. Similarly, make a list of the medications you take. Some drugs may play a role in creating mouth odors(Source: WebMD).

In most cases, your dentist can treat the cause of bad breath. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy and the odor is not of oral origin, you may be referred to your family doctor or to a specialist to determine the odor source and treatment plan. If the odor is due to gum disease, for example, your dentist can either treat the disease or refer you to a periodontist, a dentist who specializes in treating gum conditions.

For more information call Dr. Gerald Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442. Visit our website for special offers, updates and to make an appointment, www.gmdental.com.

Accepting patients from Riverside, Norco, Ontario,  Murrieta, Fontana and surrounding communities.

Improve your smile with Inlays and Onlays | Riverside CA Dentist

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Inlays and onlays are the ideal dental restorations needed to repair damaged teeth, not only improving your oral hygiene, but enhancing the look of your smile.  Dental inlays and onlays are used when old fillings need to be removed or replaced. A dental inlay is similar to a filling and fits inside the cusp tips (top edges) of the tooth. A dental onlay is more extensive and extends over the cusps of the treated tooth. Both will rejuvenate your smile! Dr. Middleton can also use inlays and onlays to replace dark, old dental restorations that can look unappealing.

How it’s done:  

There are two types of inlays and onlays: direct and indirect. Direct inlays and onlays are made in the dental office. They are placed in one visit. Indirect inlays and onlays are made in a laboratory. Two visits are needed to place them. The type your dentist will use depends on how much of the tooth is left.

Direct Inlays and Onlays

Your dentist will remove the decay and shape the tooth. He or she will put a soft material called composite resin on the tooth. The composite resin is molded to fit the tooth. The inlay is removed and hardened in a special oven. Then, your dentist will cement the hardened inlay to your tooth. After the inlay is cemented, it will be polished. Your dentist may have to shape it slightly to adjust the way your teeth come together.

There is also new technology that allows the dentist to have a ceramic inlay or onlay made in the office and cemented on at the same visit.

Indirect Inlays and Onlays

Your dentist will remove the decay. He or she then will make an impression of the prepared tooth and neighboring teeth. The tooth will get a temporary filling. The impression will be sent to a laboratory, which will make the inlay or onlay.

At your second visit, your dentist will take out the temporary filling and clean and dry the tooth. He or she will then cement the inlay or onlay to the tooth. Then it will be polished. Your dentist may have to shape it slightly to adjust the way your teeth come together.

Some dentists have a machine that allows the dentist to take a picture (instead of an impression) of the prepared tooth. Then a computer guides the machine in making a ceramic inlay, onlay or crown. This process can take less than one hour. Your inlay or onlay can then be cemented into place at the same visit.

Inlays and onlays are completely natural looking dental restorations that will restore the strength and stability to your teeth. Dr. Middleton emphasizes that inlays and onlays will make your oral hygiene routines easier! In only two dental visits, your oral health will drastically improve with inlays and onlays.

A dental inlay or onlay is bigger than a filling and smaller than a crown. It is bonded or cemented into place.

An inlay is similar to a filling, but it lies within the cusps on the chewing surface of your tooth. An onlay is larger than an inlay. It replaces one or more decayed cusps.

Inlays or onlays can be made of gold, composite resin (plastic) or ceramics. They can last for 10 years or longer. How long they last depends on:

  • The material used
  • The teeth involved
  • The forces of chewing
  • How well you maintain them with good oral hygiene and regular visits to a dentist

Watch this informative video on Inlays and Onlays:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5Wu8_MCnJs (Source: YouTube)

Only Dr. Middleton will be able to determine whether or not inlays and onlays will be right for your situation.

For your next dental restoration call Dr. Gerald Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442. Visit our website for special offers, updates and to make an appointment, www.gmdental.com.

Accepting patients from Riverside, Norco, Ontario, Eastvale, Murrieta, Fontana and surrounding communities.

Riverside Dentist | CEREC® One Visit Dental restorations

What is CEREC®? |

 

CEREC®, allows our doctors to quickly restore damaged teeth with natural-colored ceramic restorations, saving patients time and inconvenience.

CEREC® is the world’s only system for the fabrication of all ceramic dental restorations in one office visit. With CEREC® you can be in and out in a single visit with a permanent, all-ceramic crown, onlay, or veneer! For the patient this means fewer injections, less drilling, and less time out of your hectic schedule for dental care.

What does this innovation mean for a patient?

A tooth-colored restoration means no more silver fillings or discoloring smiles. The filling is natural-looking, compatible with tissue in the mouth, anti-abrasive, and plaque-resistant. We no longer need to create temporaries or take impressions and send them to a lab. Because of this, the traditional second visit has been eliminated.

How does it work?

The tooth that requires a CEREC® restoration is prepared and a 3D photograph is taken of the prepared tooth. From there, we use computer-aided design CAD software to create the restoration digitally.

Using a single block of porcelain that is color-matched to your current tooth shade, the digitally designed restoration is sent to a milling machine where your restoration is cut. The milling process usually takes about 15 minutes per restoration.

Once the restoration is finished being milled, it is fitted onto the prepared tooth and adjusted until the bite is accurate.

This procedure is great for crowns, veneers and the replacement of old fillings to give you the longest-lasting, best-looking restorations.

For your next dental restoration call Dr. Gerald Middleton in Riverside, CA at 951-688-3442. Visit our website for special offers, updates and to make an appointment, www.gmdental.com.

Accepting patients from Riverside CA, Norco CA, Ontario CA, Eastvale CA, Murrieta CA, Fontana CA and all surrounding communities.